DFW gains a whopping 146,000 residents in 2017 to lead the nation

North Texas is still booming — really booming — according to the .

The metropolitan area’s 146,000-resident jump in 2017 was the most of any metro area in the United States. And six of the top 10 fastest-growing counties in the United States were also in Texas, including Tarrant, Dallas, Denton and Collin.

Overall, Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington ranked fourth, with 7,399,662 residents, behind only the New York, Chicago and Los Angeles metro areas and ahead of Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, which ranked fifth.

“In some ways, it continues the story we‘ve been telling that we continue to see substantial growth in urbanized areas in that population triangle between Dallas-Fort Worth, San Antonio-Austin and Houston,” said state demographer Lloyd Potter of

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In the population estimates from July 1, 2016, to July 1, 2017, Tarrant County ranked fifth in the nation with a population gain of 32,729, bringing the county‘s estimated population to 2,054,475.

Tarrant County is also the third most populous county in Texas, behind only Harris and Dallas counties. City population estimates were not released.

“If you look at Tarrant County, it has what I would consider healthy growth,” Potter said.

The growth in Tarrant County was similar to what was seen in Bexar County (San Antonio), which ranked seventh, Potter said.

In Tarrant County, 48 percent of the growth is due to natural increases and 52 percent from migration.

Although Dallas and Harris counties rank in the top 10, Potter said, both had people moving out, but those numbers are offset by immigrants moving in.

The dynamic growth of Denton and Collin counties continues with both cracking the top 10. Collin County has attracted attention for landing the Toyota headquarters, among other new businesses.

“Much of that growth is being driven by job creation,” Potter said. “If we look at Texas migration, much of that is driven by domestic migration from California, Illinois, New York and also Florida.”

Of the counties that ring Dallas-Fort Worth — Collin, Denton, Ellis, Johnson, Hood, Hunt, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell and Wise — 74 percent of their growth came from migration.

Any impact of Hurricane Harvey on the Texas Gulf Coast population could begin to show up in the next census estimates.

Bill Hanna: ,

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